Thursday, June 25, 2015

Mr. Goats' Father's Day Gift

Hello lovelies! It's Friday, and I've got The. Perfect. weekend project for you!


This is what I gifted Mr. Goats for Father's Day!

He loves his charcoal Weber grill, but we only had the aluminum tripod that it came with. There was nowhere to prep food, place food, or hold grilling tools, so this was obvs not super functional.

The photo above has been pinned on Pinterest countless times, but I can't seem to find a source for it. 


The design is based on a photo I saw of a potting table, which goes to show this would also make an amazing potting bench (cut the hole on top to suit your needs, or create a slab-top and use this as an outdoor buffet/serving station!).


Oh, I didn't mention!! It has a tilt-out bin!


And I've got plans so you can build your own!

Please note that these plans do not include instructions/materials for the top of the table. I planned to do a concrete top to inset the grill, but Mr. Goats broke his toe and I am physically unable to handle an 80# bag of concrete. The top photographed is made from cedar fence pickets and i would be perfectly content with it if I hadn't had my heart set on a concrete top. It's weather-resistant and beautiful! If you love it, add 5 fence pickets to your shopping list. 

Shopping List:

8 - 2x3@8'
12 - 5 1/2" x 72" (1x6) Cedar Fence Pickets (we only have dog-eared, so that's what I used)
3 - 1x2@8'
1 - set outdoor hinges + pull (I used these)
1 1/4" outdoor pocket hole screws
2 1/2" outdoor pocket hole screws
Outdoor Glue (I use Titebond III)

Cut List:

2x3
  4 @ 49" (stretchers)
  4 @ 32" (legs)
  2 @ 24" (shelf stretcher)
  2 @ 24 1/2" (front/back divider)
  8 @ 25" (deep stretchers)

1x6 Cedar Fence Pickets
  15 @ 28" (shelf boards and side slats)
    7 @ 22" (front and back of "drawer")
    6 @ 21" (sides of "drawer")
    3 @ 22" (bottom of "drawer")

1x2
  2 @ 24" (drawer frame front stiles)
  2 @ 17" (drawer frame back stiles)
  4 @ 19" (drawer frame rails)
  4 @ 21" (drawer stretchers)

Dimensions:

56 1/2" W x 30" D x 33 1/2" H
(dimensions are given based on suggested tabletop size, accounting for a 1 1/2" top)


Before beginning your build, please familiarize yourself with the plans and view the 3D model in Google's 3D Warehouse here. This will reduce the chances of running into errors after you begin building.

Step 1:


You get two pictures in one step because I didn't capture all of the dimensions in a single shot.

Begin by building the main frame using wood glue and 2 1/2" pocket hole screws. The top "shelf" can be placed at your desired height, but make sure to match the front and back frames. Make two.

Step 2:



With your front and back frames built, you can add the 25" stretchers as pictured. I found it easiest to start from the outsides, in. The only thing to pay special attention to is the bottom, middle stretcher. It should be flush with the top of the adjoining boards.

Step 3:


Finish adding the stretchers to create the top shelf.

Step 4:

Make the front frame for your "drawer" using glue and 1 1/4" pocket hole screws.

Step 5:


Make the back frame for your "drawer".

Step 6:

With your 21" dividers, create your drawer "box" as shown above.

Step 7:

 Finish your box by first gluing/screwing the side boards in from the front and back of the frames (countersinking your screws) and then gluing/screwing the front and backs. I screwed from the inside of the drawer frames into the outer boards. Set aside.

You have the option of leaving gaps between the boards to fill up all the space or ripping a board to the remaining gap, but I just left the space at the top. 

Step 8:

Notch out four of the shelf boards to the dimensions above. These will be the front and back boards of your shelves.

Screw your shelf boards in place, starting with the bottom shelf, first. Use glue and 1 1/4" outdoor screws (I used pocket hole screws w/o pocket holes, because it was what I had).

Step 9:


Insert the pull out "drawer", using a 1/4" spacer on the bottom. Attach hinges and drawer pull. If necessary, add a stop block (created with a wood scrap) to the inside of the frame using glue and screws.

Step 10:

Screw on the side slats using glue and 1 1/4" screws.

There! Your table is built!! The choices on tops are endless, from tile to wood to concrete! Suggested dimensions for the top are 30" x 56 1/2".

I'll be t.h.r.i.l.l.e.d. when we can get our concrete top built! Then, Mr. goats will stop using my newly finished bench to hold his super hot tools.


Plans for her are coming soon ;-)

Disclaimer: Please use common sense when building. In this case, use common sense when grilling. Fire may come out the bottom of the grill, so add a barrier to prevent your newly-built (and amazing) grilling table from catching flame, and avoid grilling items that may cause the fire to crackle. I, Gina @ LadyGoats.com am not responsible for loss or injury incurred by building/using your table. Build and use at your own risk! Have fun!

28 comments:

  1. Wow. I love it!!! What a great idea and an amazing build!! I feel like that would even work for a big green egg smoker/grill as well. Great job G!!

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    1. Thanks!! Seeing a green egg table is what prompted this whole endeavor. Unfortunately I couldn't find any simple-to-follow plans for one (which I need ;-) ), so I had to make my own.

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    2. Well it came out great!! I've been looking for the perfect BBQ station for a weber grill and the ones that I've seen just haven't done it for me. Most of them are too small or have no prep work area. This one is perfect. And that pull out compartment is perfect for storing charcoal!

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  2. It is lovely and totally functional, and the concrete top is brilliant. But if you build it with a wood top, doesn't the grill get too hot for the wood? Does the grill not touch the wood somehow?
    Thanks, Maria B.

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    1. Thank you, Maria!! I actually cut the hole 1" larger than the grill lid (leaving wiggle room to put the lid on), and screwed lag bolts into the 2x4 framework. The grill lip rests on the bolts, it does not directly touch the wood. I refrained from including that in the post because there weren't any definite specs on how to do this (I went with what I've seen others do with their grilling tables), so I'd suggest you research and do what feels best to you.


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  3. LOVE, Love, love this project! Thanks for sharing and being such an inspiration! Featured on Ana-White.com today!

    "Ana White and Team"

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  4. Thanks Ana! Thanks for all that YOU do!
    Xoxo

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  5. Gina, were your fence posts dog eared? That is all I can find and I was wondering if that was factored into your shopping list. Thanks in advance! This looks great!

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    1. Hi Bryan! Yes, dog-eared pickets are all we have here, too :-/ thanks for the question! I've updated the post.

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  6. Yes, Please post how you did the cement counter top. I am VERY VERY VERY interested. Thanks for posting this. I really like this post!!! :)

    Sincerely, Rachel

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  7. We are really excited to start working on this project but we are unclear on how you attached the cedar fence posts for the bottom of the "drawer" Can you clarify that for us? Thanks!

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    1. Yay, super excited to hear it! Thank you for letting me know that I totally spaced on explaining that part..! The boards actually sit on the frame going from the front and back. I'll post a picture tomorrow.

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  8. This is amazing. I'm gonna skip the space for grill and just make it one whole table. Love it. I would love to see how you did the concrete top. Have u been able to do that yet?

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    1. Hi Sandy! Nooooo, we still haven't done the concrete top. I need to figure out the best way to pour it in place, because I know for a fact that I won't be able to help the Mr. pick it up to place it on the island. SIIIIIGH. I love the idea to just have this as a full table. This is still definitely one of my favorite builds!!

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  9. I'm in the middle of building this and I have to say that these plans are very bad. It seems like the cut list was made up after the project was complete rather than while doing it.

    For example, if you use 49" stretchers and put an upright 24" in from one side for the self, this leaves you with 21.5 inches to fit your 22" drawer. Also, 28" planks for the bottom and shelf doesn't cover the entire bottom from the outside edge to the drawer, they need to be 31" to do that. These plans call for a 2.5" cut out for the front planks on the shelf, but 2x4s are 3.5 inches. This would mean there is an inch of exposed 2x4 on the outside edge of the shelf. This is clearly not what's shown in the plans.

    My advice to anyone who is doing this project is to not follow the cut list. You will be much happier with the end result.

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    1. Mario, I made a fatal error, and have no excuses. I am so sorry. I built this with 2x3s, not 2x4s, and drew up the plans with 2x3s. I will fix that now, and, and appreciate you coming by to help anyone else that attempts to build this.

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  10. Is it possible to get a picture of this form the front. I have not been able to find a way to mount my weber kettle safely and efficiently. Nice Job!

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    1. I'll be happy to get a shot of it straight-on tomorrow. What is it that you're looking for? If you don't mind, email me at ladygoats at gmail dot com and I can get a bunch of different angles to ya.

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  11. You used cedar pickets for the drawer..what did you use for the frame

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  12. Can I add casters to this so I can roll it into my garage after the grilling season is over?

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    1. If you don't mind the added height casters will add, or trim the height from the legs, that's an amazing idea!

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  13. Are these plans updated and accurate now? Great idea!!

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    1. They are! Just make sure you use 2x3s, and you're all good. Got an email from someone that finished it last night (though she pointed out that I never said to put the drawer bottom in, so I'll go in and add that to step 7!).

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  14. If I use a cement top, do you think it would be safe to have the grill resting on the cement or should I secure it another way? Where do you store the grill lid? Do you notice any water damaging your charcoal that you store in the bin?

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    1. Great questions! Before beginning this build, I read through many kettle grill forums where people did place the grills directly on concrete counters. The ones that did it claimed that they had no problems, and it withstood the heat perfectly. Some people did say it was a bad idea, with varying reasons. I would recommend a glance at a forum on this topic. I, personally, I would feel comfortable settung the grill onto the concrete counter, but have no experience in doing so. We haven't had any issues with the charcoal getting wet, but I have debated getting a tub to put it in as a preventive measure. We don't get a lot of precipitation in the Sonoran desert, so it really hasn't come to that, yet… if you get a lot of rain, I would definitely recommend finding something to store it in.

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